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About the Book

Beyond the Book

360 pp., 6.125 x 9.25, 24 halftones, 1 maps, notes, bibl., index

Braceros

Migrant Citizens and Transnational Subjects in the Postwar United States and Mexico


At the beginning of World War II, the United States and Mexico launched the bracero program, a series of labor agreements that brought Mexican men to work temporarily in U.S. agricultural fields. In Braceros, Deborah Cohen asks why these migrants provoked so much concern and anxiety in the United States and what the Mexican government expected to gain in participating in the program. Cohen creatively links the often-unconnected themes of exploitation, development, the rise of consumer cultures, and gendered class and race formation to show why those with connections beyond the nation have historically provoked suspicion, anxiety, and retaliatory political policies.

About the Author

Deborah Cohen is associate professor of history at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.


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