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552 pp., 6 x 9, 2 illus.

Paper
ISBN  978-0-8078-6957-4
Published: September 2011

American Slavery As It Is

Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses

By Theodore Dwight Weld


Compiled by a prominent abolitionist Theodore Dwight Weld, American Slavery As It Is combines information taken from witnesses, and from active and former slave owners, to generate a condemnation of slavery from both those who observed it and those who perpetuated it. The narrative describes the appalling day-to-day conditions of the over 2,700,000 men, women and children in slavery in the United States. Weld demonstrates how even prisoners--in the United States and in other countries--were significantly better fed than American slaves. Readers will find one of the most meticulous records of slave life available in this text. Unlike personal slave narratives, which focus on a single man or woman's experience, American Slavery details the overall conditions of slaves across multiple states and several years.

A DOCSOUTH BOOK. This collaboration between UNC Press and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library brings selected classic works from the digital library of Documenting the American South back into print. DocSouth Books uses the latest digital technologies to make these works available as downloadable e-books or print-on-demand publications. DocSouth Books are unaltered from the original publication, providing affordable and easily accessible editions to a new generation of scholars, students, and general readers.

About the Author

Theodore Dwight Weld (1803-1895), a dedicated reformer and abolitionist, compiled American Slavery As It Is to serve as a powerful and detailed abolitionist tract.


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